Polychromed ceramic vessel from the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan depicting Tlaloc, the rain god. Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico.
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Image courtesy of the Museo del Templo Mayor, Mexico.

Tlaloc

Tlaloc was an important deity of rain and fertility of the Aztec mythology. Aztec people were living in Mexico during the fifteenth and sixteenth century. Tlaloc was pictured as a man wearing a net of clouds, a crown of heron feathers, foam sandals and carrying rattles to make thunder.

Tlaloc brought on great wrath upon the Aztec people. He often used his lightning bolts to make the people sick. It is said that he had four different jugs of water in his possession. When he emptied the first one, it brought life to plants. The second would cause blight, the third brought on frost, and the fourth would bring total destruction.

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