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Missions to Jupiter

Mission Country Launch Date Arrival Date Type Encounter Characteristics

Pioneer 11 USA April 6, 1973 September 1, 1979 Flyby Returned detailed pictures of Jupiter and Jupiter's Great Red Spot.
Voyager 1 USA September 5, 1977 November 13, 1980 Flyby Returned photographs and information on Jupiter's many moons.
Voyager 2 USA August 20, 1977 August 26, 1981 Flyby Showed that Jupiter's Great Red Spot is really a complex storm, and that Io, one of Jupiter's moons, has active volcanism.
Galileo USA & Europe October18, 1989 February 10, 1990 Orbiter/Probe The Galileo Probe successfully descended into Jupiter's atmosphere
on December 7,1995.
Galileo Orbiter successfully entered orbit well above the cloud tops of
Jupiter on December 7, 1995 and is currently observing the Jupiter system.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF