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The Constellation Leo, the lion
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Leo

Leo, the lion, is easy to find because his head looks like a backward question mark with the bright star Regulus at the bottom.

Regulus, Leo's brightest star, means "little king" in Latin. This star is one of the brightest stars in the spring sky, and it has a sparkling blue color.

Although the ancient Greeks and Romans saw the shape of a lion in this constellation, the ancient Chinese saw the shape of a horse. If you use your imagination, maybe you can, too!

Leo is visible from February through June. Cancer sets to the east and Virgo is to the west. Hydra and Crater are below.

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