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Windows to Adventure: Windows to the Morning Star
Windows to Adventure, a book series by Claudia Alexander devoted to geology, astronomy, the planets, atmospheric science, oceans, and climate, uses fantasy characters, magical realms, and legends from regions around the world, to make science accessible to readers of 3rd or 4th grade. Book 2: Windows to Adventure: Windows to the Morning Star

Our price: $7.99
Windows to Adventure: Which of the mountains is Greatest of All?
Windows to Adventure, a book series by Claudia Alexander devoted to geology, astronomy, the planets, atmospheric science, oceans, and climate, uses fantasy characters, magical realms, and legends from regions around the world, to make science accessible to readers of 3rd or 4th grade. Book 1: Windows to Adventure: Which of the mountains is Greatest of All?. This is a free beta version of this e-book.

Click here to download (you don't need to add it to cart)


Our price: $0.01
Where Do Mountains Come From, Momma?
Where Do Mountains Come From, Momma?
by Catherine Weyerhaeuser Morley
32 pages • 8.5 x 11 • full color illustrations • illustrated glossary
cloth $12.00 • ISBN 978-0-87842-582-2
Item No. 367
Geology/Children’s
For ages 4 to 8
January 2012

A book to answer every child’s lofty questions

Our price: $9.60
Market price: $12.00 save 20%
Quantity (from 1 to 1000)
Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather
Warnings: The True Story of How Science Tamed the Weather is a story of courageous scientists who created a storm warning system that saves literally thousands of lives each year in the United States. From Category 5 hurricanes to F-5 tornadoes, Warnings is a fascinating story about saving lives during the most massive storms of our lifetime. Warnings focuses on tornadoes, hurricanes, and commercial aviation. With five-star ratings at both Amazon and Barnes & Noble, Warnings is a highly entertaining read.

Our price: $24.95
Quantity (from 1 to 1000)
The Earth Scientist, Volume XXVIII, Issue 3, Fall 2012
sponsored by National Science Foundation.

Articles in the Fall 2012 issue of The Earth Scientist include:

  • Discovering Careers in the Earth Sciences, by Geoff Camphire
  • The Carbon Cycle Game: A Regionally Relevant Activity to Introduce Climate Change, by Joëlle Clark, Jane Marks, Carol Haden, Melinda Bell and Bruce Hungate
  • The ELF: Building Climate Change Science Knowledge Through Hands‑on Activities, by Louise Huffman, Jean Pennycook, Frank Rack and Betsy Youngman
  • EarthLabs – An Earth System Science Laboratory Module to Facilitate Teaching About Climate Change, by Tamara Shapiro Ledley, Nick Haddad, Erin Bardar, Katherine Ellins, Karen McNeal and Julie Libarkin
  • Teaching Controversy, by Mark McCaffrey
  • Lesson Plans and Classroom Activities from the Climate Literacy Ambassadors Community, by Margaret Mooney, Steve Ackerman, Galen McKinley, Tom Whittaker and Tommy Jasmin
  • Predicting the Impacts of Climate Change on Ecosystems: A High School Curricular Module, by Vanessa Peters, Tanya Dewey, Andrew Kwok, George Starr Hammond and Nancy Butler Songer

The print version of this issue contains an Earth Science Week poster from AGI.


Our price: $10.00
Quantity (from 1 to 100)
The Earth Scientist, Volume XXVIII, Issue 2, Summer 2012

Articles in the Summer 2012 issue of The Earth Scientist include:

  • Tornado Debris Balls, by James Vavrek, Jason Rybinski, Allen Pokracki and Brian Wilkes,
  • Data Analysis: Tropical Storm and Hurricane Frequency, by Ben Wildeboer
  • Measuring the Solar System in Our Own Backyard, by Brittnee Lydy and Brian Polk
  • Stars in Their Eyes, Math on Their Minds, by Craig Beals and Jennifer Combs
  • Teaching STEM with Web-Based GIS, by Joseph Kerski

The print version of this Summer TES issue contains, for your classroom, a full color poster from NOAA, "Ten signs of a Warming World".


Our price: $10.00
Quantity (from 1 to 100)
The Earth Scientist, Volume XXVIII, Issue 1, Spring 2012
sponsored by Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Education and Public Outreach Office.

Articles in the Spring 2012 issue of The Earth Scientist include:

  • Decoding Starlight: From Pixels to Images, by Doug Lombardi
  • Ice Core Records – From Volcanoes To Supernovas, by Donna Young
  • Transit of Venus, by Elaine Lewis, Sten Odenwald and Troy Cline
  • Pulsating Variable Stars and the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram, by Donna Young
  • Investigating Supernova Remnants, by Doug Lombardi


Our price: $10.00
Quantity (from 1 to 100)
The Earth Scientist, Volume XXVII, Issue 4, Winter 2011

Our Winter 2011 issue of The Earth Scientist includes 6 articles dealing with various aspects of Earth Science. These include an article recapping the 2011 MESTA/NESTA Summer Field Conference in Hawaii. Then there’s an article asking the question, “Is there such a thing as geological patience?” An article is included describing how rocks and fossils can be used to stimulate student curiosity. We’ve included an exceptional article, summarizing the results of our 2011 NESTA survey “What’s Happening in Earth & Space Science Education, Today?” There’s an article showing how you can effectively use Science Notebooks while working with your classes on a student activity dealing with issues surrounding Waste Management. The issue also includes an article describing a secure method by which your students can easily have conversations, on-line, with real scientists, in a way that stimulates the students’ thinking and questioning techniques. Finally, as this is the final TES issue of the year, I have included for your use, an Index of all the articles for 2011.

The print version of this TES issue includes two posters for your use. The Sun Earth Day Poster is graciously provided by NASA. The Pacific Ocean Poster was provided by the people at Coast and Ocean in California. A key to the map is included on page 35 of this issue.


Our price: $10.00
Quantity (from 1 to 100)
The Earth Scientist, Volume XXVII, Issue 3, Fall 2011
Our Fall, 2011 issue of The Earth Scientist includes 7 articles dealing with various aspects of Earth Science. These include an article packed with information detailing Classroom Activities and Supporting Resources for Understanding the Earth’s Climate. Then there’s an article describing a unique Galileoscope Workshop recently presented in Montana. An article is included describing a first hand account of a teacher’s recent South Pacific voyage on a research vessel, the JOIDES Resolution. We’ve included an exceptional article, rich in background information, describing the continuing development of the Geologic and Biologic information in and around Lake Yellowstone. There’s an article showing how you can effectively deal with several of the common Earth Science misconceptions held among your students. The issue also includes an article from the American Geological Institute (AGI) announcing the details of its 2011 Earth Science Week, as well as an article announcing the details of the National Park Service’s (NPS) 2011 National Fossil Day. Additionally, to accompany these last two articles, the hard copy of this TES issue contains, for your classroom, two, full color posters: one announcing AGI’s 14th Annual Earth Science Week, and the second announcing the NPS’s National Fossil Day. We are proud to present these quality articles (and posters) which we hope will provide substantial background information for you, and/or allow immediate application in your classroom.

Our price: $10.00
Quantity (from 1 to 100)
The Earth Scientist, Volume XXVII, Issue 2, Summer 2011
Contained in this very special issue is an article exploring the steps, hurdles and frustrations encountered when teachers not specifically trained in the Earth sciences, suddenly find themselves assigned to teach the discipline. The next article introduces a comprehensive, 20 day unit on natural cycling of energy and matter. Another article seeks to eliminate student’s misconceptions surrounding radioactive decay and radioactive dating, through the use of hands-on activities. Another article deals with dispelling, through the use of hands-on activities, the misconceptions of middle school students regarding the formation of the Grand Canyon. A unique article promotes geographic literacy of African environments through the application of map exercises. Another useful article explores the use of three guided student explorations of Sky in Google Earth. A remarkable article explores the integration into the classroom of audio, Earth and space science news stories. A fine article is included which shares ten examples of utilizing existing Gigapixel Panoramas in the Earth and space science classroom. And finally, acknowledging that the end of each school year presents its own unique set of challenges, an article explains the use of student choice in a solar system unit, to increase positive classroom behavior near the end of the school year.

Our price: $10.00
Quantity (from 1 to 98)