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Our Glaciers: Then and Now activity kit helps you see the changes taking place in glaciers around the world. See all our activity kits and classroom activities.
This is a drawing of the interior of Europa.
Click on image for full size

Interior of Europa

The diagram to the left shows a cutaway of the possible interior structure of Europa. The composition of the icy moons is mostly ice, therefore there is probably a small core of some rocky material buried inside, covered with ice.

The diagram shows that there may be an ocean of water beneath the surface crust of ice on Europa. This is because the temperature inside Europa may be just right for water. Such an environment might prove to be suitable for life.

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