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This is an image of Callisto.
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NASA

Callisto

Callisto was first discovered by Galileo in 1610, making it one of the Galilean Satellites. Of the 60 moons it is the 8th closest to Jupiter, with a standoff distance of 1,070,000 km. It is the 2nd largest moon and is larger than the Earth's moon, with a diameter that is about the distance across the United States, of 4800 km (2983 miles).

Callisto is named after one of Jupiter's many lovers from Greek mythology. Read the myth by using the link below. Callisto's main characteristic is its completely cratered and ancient surface. It is considered one of the Icy Moons because it is mostly made of ice. The Galileo mission discovered that Callisto had a very thin atmosphere.

Last modified September 19, 2003 by Jennifer Bergman.

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