NOTE: If you can read this, then you have not entered our site from the proper entry point! In order for all links to function properly, you must start by clicking here.



Aolian Processes

Winds are highly variable in direction and power. In spite of the local weather however, the global pattern of winds is very predictable.

Wind is part of the forces of nature which change the Earth's surface. To assist wind in eroding, weathering and transporting material, the processes of chemical and mechanical weathering must already have had an effect. Once there is a breakup of the mineral particles of which rock is made, winds can act.

The power of wind to produce an effect is accomplished through its force, its ability to carry particles, and it's ability to drive particles into solid rock.



The Effects of Wind

Winds are highly variable in direction and power. In spite of the local weather however, the global pattern of winds is very predictable.

Wind is part of the forces of nature which change the Earth's surface. To assist wind in eroding, weathering and transporting material, the processes of chemical and mechanical weathering must already have had an effect. Once there is a breakup of the mineral particles of which rock is made, winds can act.

The power of wind to produce an effect is accomplished through its force, its ability to carry particles, and it's ability to drive particles into solid rock.



The Effects of Wind

Winds are highly variable in direction and power. In spite of the local weather however, the global pattern of winds is very predictable.

Wind is part of the forces of nature which change the Earth's surface. To assist wind in eroding and weathering material, the particles of which rock is made must already be partially broken up.

Once there is a breakup of the particles of which rock is made, the power of wind to produce an effect is accomplished through its force, its ability to carry particles, and it's ability to drive particles into solid rock.




Last modified January 5, 1998 by the Windows Team

The source of this material is Windows to the Universe, at http://www.windows.ucar.edu/ at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). © The Regents of the University of Michigan. Windows to the Universe® is a registered trademark of UCAR. All Rights Reserved. Site policies and disclaimer