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Our Glaciers: Then and Now activity kit helps you see the changes taking place in glaciers around the world. See all our activity kits and classroom activities.

When Nature Strikes: Wildfires

In this episode, you will learn about a common natural hazard - wildfires, and how technology can help us model and predict the behavior of wildfires for those who are fighting them. As fires burn they draw in surrounding air creating updrafts and changeable winds. This aspect of wildfires poses a challenge for our first responders. In this video you will learn about the interaction of fire and weather, and how scientists like Janice Coen from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, uses this information to make predictions about the movements of wildfires.

Click on the video to watch the NBC Learn video - When Nature Strikes: Wildfires.

Scientists like Janice Coen are studying the mechanisms that control fires to help warn against future catastrophes caused by wildfires. "When Nature Strikes" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

When Nature Strikes: Wildfires - Why are they a challenge to stop?Classroom Activity

Last modified April 28, 2016 by Jennifer Bergman.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA