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When Nature Strikes: Flash Floods

Almost anywhere you are, heavy rainfall can produce a dangerous flash flood. Even if you are camping high on a mountain, a slow-moving thunderstorm can cause streams to rise quickly and threaten your campsite. Flash floods can occur in areas that are far away from where the rain falls: you could be riding in a car in a desert and water which fell many miles away in the mountains can rush toward you down what is normally a dry stream bed.

This episode of "When Nature Strikes" teaches you that flash floods are one of the deadliest weather threats in the U.S. During the past thirty years, more than 125 people each year have been killed by flash flooding. For comparison, on average, 73 people are killed by lightning, 68 by tornadoes, and 16 by hurricanes, although these numbers can vary greatly from year to year.

After you read the discussion, play the accompanying 'Jeopardy Game'.

"What Should You Do When Flash Floods Threaten" classroom activity

"When Nature Strikes"is produced by NBC Learn in partnership withthe National Science Foundation.

Last modified April 28, 2016 by Jennifer Bergman.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA