Shop Windows to the Universe

Ready, Set, SCIENCE!, by the National Research Council, focuses on K-8 science classsrooms. Check out the other publications in our online store, as well as classroom materials.
This map of South America includes the Southeast Pacific region, including the Southeast Pacific Ocean, the coastal regions of Peru and Chile, and the Andes Mountains.
Click on image for full size
Image Courtesy of NASA's Earth Observatory

The Southeast Pacific Region

The Southeast Pacific region is a very diverse part of South America. It includes coasts along the ocean and the Andes mountains in Chile and Peru.

The climate of the Southeast Pacific is influenced by the Andes, ocean currents, and winds. These things cause upwelling in the ocean and help keep the ocean and air temperatures cool.

The coast of Peru and northern Chile has a subtropical desert climate. Fog is common on the coast, and the only precipitation is an occasional light drizzle. This area also contains the Atacama Desert, which is one of the driest places on the Earth. The Atacama Desert contains many minerals, including copper. Central Chile has a mild climate and receives more rain than the northern areas.

Chile has some island territories located in the Pacific Ocean, including Easter Island. Easter Island is 3,600 km (2,237 miles) off the coast of Chile and has a humid, subtropical climate.

Last modified August 29, 2008 by Dennis Ward.

Shop Windows to the Universe Science Store!

Our online store includes issues of NESTA's quarterly journal, The Earth Scientist, full of classroom activities on different topics in Earth and space science, as well as books on science education!

Windows to the Universe Community

News

Opportunities

You might also be interested in:

Traveling Nitrogen Classroom Activity Kit

Check out our online store - minerals, fossils, books, activities, jewelry, and household items!...more

Southeast Pacific Climate

There are a lot of clouds over the Southeast Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Peru and Chile in South America. In fact, this area has the largest amount of stratus and stratocumulus clouds in the world!...more

Surface Ocean Currents

The water at the ocean surface is moved by powerful wind. The wind is able to move the top 400 meters of the ocean. This moving water is called surface ocean currents. Surface ocean currents form large...more

Wind

Wind is moving air. Warm air rises, and cool air comes in to take its place. This movement creates the winds around the globe. Winds move at different speeds and have different names based on their speed....more

Ocean Upwelling

There are places in the ocean where water from the deep sea travels up to the surface. These are called areas of upwelling. The deep waters can have a large influence on marine life and the climate too....more

What Is Climate?

How do you know to pack your bathing suit and sunhat for a trip to a tropical island or pack warm sweaters and coats for a trip to Alaska? If you know a little about regional climates, then you know what...more

Fog

Fog is a cloud that touches the ground. Fog usually forms when moist air travels over cold land or water. The moist air cools down and the water vapor condenses and forms a cloud near the Earth's surface....more

Drizzle

Drizzle is very light rain; the water drops that make up drizzle are smaller than rain drops. Drizzle can be so light that only a millimeter of water falls to the Earth's surface in one day. It is produced...more

Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA