Shop Windows to the Universe

Check out the fun Earth science related bumper stickers in our online store! Express yourself!
Animation showing monthly changes on the Earth's surface over a complete year.
Click on image for full size
NASA's Earth Observatory

North and South: Opposite Seasons

NASA's Earth Observatory has recently started making images of the entire surface of the Earth every month. There are no clouds in the images because they combine many pictures taken at different times when the weather is clear in different places. The polar ice caps look larger than they really are because of how the globe was projected onto a rectangle.

The animation begins in January, when it is winter in the North and summer in the South. As the months go by, you can see the ice and snow melt in the North and then return the following winter.

There is not as much land far in the South, so the change in the snow is less obvious. But you can see the land in the South grow more green in the summer (when it is winter in the North) and more brown in the winter (when it is summer in the North).

For the first time, you can see with your own eyes how the seasons are opposite in the North and South.

Last modified October 31, 2006 by Travis Metcalfe.

Shop Windows to the Universe Science Store!

The Summer 2010 issue of The Earth Scientist, available in our online store, includes articles on rivers and snow, classroom planetariums, satellites and oceanography, hands-on astronomy, and global warming.

Windows to the Universe Community

News

Opportunities

You might also be interested in:

Traveling Nitrogen Classroom Activity Kit

Check out our online store - minerals, fossils, books, activities, jewelry, and household items!...more

The Four Seasons

The Earth travels around the sun one full time per year. During this year, the seasons change depending on the amount of sunlight reaching the surface and the Earth's tilt as it revolves around the sun....more

What Causes the Seasons?

Let's get rid of some common misconceptions about the seasons. The Earth's orbit is in the shape of an ellipse, so that sometimes the Earth is a little bit closer to the Sun than at other times. Is this...more

Life in an Antarctic Field Camp

Organizing a science camp for a field party of twelve people to conduct research for six weeks in Antarctica seems like an insurmountable task. And yet, here we are. It took much planning and hard work...more

Winter observing in July

Remember me? Last month I was observing targets of the Kepler space mission at Teide Observatory on Tenerife. Now I am in Chile to observe targets of the CoRoT space mission. CoRoT is a satellite devoted...more

Native American Astronomy

By 30,000 B.C,. Asian hunter-gatherers had crossed the Bering Strait into North America. These people were the first to inhabit this new land and so they are known as the Native Americans of North America....more

Archeoastronomy

"The movements of the heavenly bodies are an admirable thing, well known and manifest to all peoples. There are no people, no matter how barbaric and primitive, that do not raise up their eyes, take note,...more

The Stones of Carnac

The stones of Carnac, France, are probably the most famous stones markings outside of those found at Stonehenge in England. Where Stonehenge is composed of standing stones, the Carnac area has many different...more

Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF