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Pisces, the Fish. Can you find the brightest star, Alrisha?
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Pisces

The constellation Pisces is known as the fish. Almost every ancient civilization saw this figure. It is either explained as a single fish or a pair, depending on the civilization. Pisces can be found during the months of September through January.

In Greek mythology, the two fish represent Aphrodite and her son, Eros. One day they were fleeing the giant Typhon, when they jumped into a stream, turned to fish and swam away. It is said they tied a string to their tails so they could stay together. Even the constellation shows this long string shared between them.

The brightest star in Pisces is named Alrisha, which is Arabic for "The Knot". It ties the two fish together in the middle of the constellation. The easternmost fish is located just below Andromeda. The westernmost is below Pegasus. The string starts with the eastern fish and travels south towards Cetus before heading west to connect with the other fish.

Unfortunately, there aren't many objects of interest in Pisces. There is one galaxy called M74 located a little south of the eastern fish, to the left of the string.

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Alrisha

What's in a Name: Arabic for "the knot". Claim to Fame: Brightest star in Pisces. The corner of the "V" shape, which is the line that holds the two fish together. Type of Star: White Main Sequence Star...more

Andromeda

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