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Our Glaciers: Then and Now activity kit helps you see the changes taking place in glaciers around the world. See all our activity kits and classroom activities.

Northern Hemisphere Constellations

Many different constellations fill the evening sky in the northern hemisphere. Depending on your location and the season, different constellations can be seen. Northern circumpolar constellations can be seen all year long in the night sky of the northern hemisphere, and appear to circle about the Pole star. This image shows an illustration of Ursa Major, the Great Bear.

Northern Circumpolar Constellations Northern Spring Constellation Northern Summer Constellations Northern Autumn Constellations Northern Winter Constellations
Cassiopeia
Cepheus
Draco
Ursa Major
Ursa Minor
Bootes
Cancer
Crater
Hydra
Leo
Virgo
Aquila
Cygnus
Hercules
Lyra
Ophiuchus
Sagittarius
Scorpius
Andromeda
Aquarius
Capricornus
Pegasus
Pisces
Canis Major
Cetus
Eridanus
Gemini
Orion
Perseus
Taurus

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The Fall 2009 issue of The Earth Scientist, which includes articles on student research into building design for earthquakes and a classroom lab on the composition of the Earth’s ancient atmosphere, is available in our online store.

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Science, Evolution, and Creationism

How did life evolve on Earth? The answer to this question can help us understand our past and prepare for our future. Although evolution provides credible and reliable answers, polls show that many people turn away from science, seeking other explanations with which they are more comfortable....more

Ursa Major

Ursa Major is a very famous constellation. It is also called the Great Bear. Ursa Minor is the Little Bear. The body and tail of the Big Bear make up the Big Dipper. There are a lot of myths about this...more

Bootes

Bootes, the herdsman, rides through the sky during the late Spring and early Summer. Bootes is fun to look at because it has the shape of a kite, with the bright star Arcturus at the point of the kite...more

Cancer

The constellation Cancer is a crab. Look for Cancer from December through June. It's hard to see Cancer because the stars are so dim. To find Cancer, first find Gemini and Leo. Cancer is right between...more

Crater

The constellation Crater is known as the Cup! The stars in Crater are very faint, so it is hard to see. Crater is between Leo and Hydra. Corvus the Crow is next to it. You can see Crater from March through...more

Hydra

Hydra, the sea serpent, may be the longest and largest of all constellations, but its stars are very faint. It is so long that four constellations run along its northern side. These are Cancer, Leo, Virgo...more

Leo

Leo, the lion, is easy to find because his head looks like a backward question mark with the bright star Regulus at the bottom. Regulus, Leo's brightest star, means "little king" in Latin. This star is...more

Virgo

The constellation Virgo is The Maiden. People thought it was Athena, Artemis, Persephone or Demeter. She is carrying a grain of wheat and a staff. Can you tell it's a person in the picture? The maiden...more

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