Cassiopeia, the Queen.
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Cassiopeia

Cassiopeia was the queen of an ancient land. She and her husband, Cepheus, had a daughter named Andromeda. Cassiopeia would always say she was prettier than the sea nymphs. A monster called Cetus was sent to punish her. It was about to eat Andromeda, when Perseus saved her. All five are now constellations.

Cassiopeia is easy to find because it looks like a "W"! It's a circumpolar constellation, so you can see it all year long. If you use a telescope, you can find lots of cool objects around the constellation.

There are a few nebulae in Cassiopeia, including the Bubble Nebula. There are also several star clusters, or groups of stars, and even some galaxies! Next time you are outside on a clear night, check out this old constellation.

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