Shop Windows to the Universe

The Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0 DVD from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific is in our online store, filled with Earth and space science resources.

Working with K-12 Students


Have Enthusiasm
The most important aspect of your visit is your attitude toward the students, the subject matter, and learning. Your enthusiasm for engaging with students and sharing your work is infectious.

Convey Big Ideas and Objectives
Following a brief introduction, tell students and the teacher what they are going to do during your visit so that they know what to expect. Plan smooth transitions between the different parts of your visit so that students and teacher know how different items are connected and how they are relevant to the type of science you do. During the last 10 minutes of your visit, review the main points of the activities done in class and allow students to ask questions.

Address Studentsí Needs and Interests
Knowing your audience is important. Often the audience will differ according to their age. For example, younger children are literal and concrete, but are able to begin thinking abstractly at about the age eleven. Young teens often avoid public attention and, even when interested, may act passive and unresponsive. Toward the end of high school, some students may feel that they have no ability in science, mathematics, or engineering. If possible, make connections between your research and real-life decisions or situations that students may encounter. The thought that science can impact their lives (whether or not they become scientists) often reaches students who are not easily engaged in science.

Include Features of Classroom Inquiry

According to Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (Table 2.5, NRC, 2000), the following essential features of classroom inquiry are a critical part of science education:

  • Learners are engaged by scientifically oriented questions.
  • Learners give priority to evidence, which allows them to develop and evaluate explanations that address scientifically oriented questions.
  • Learners formulate explanations from evidence to address scientifically oriented questions.
  • Learners evaluate their explanations in light of alternative explanations, particularly those reflecting scientific understanding
  • Learners communicate and justify their proposed explanations.

Resources:

Last modified September 30, 2005 by Lisa Gardiner.

Shop Windows to the Universe Science Store!

Our online store includes books on science education, classroom activities in The Earth Scientist, mineral and fossil specimens, and educational games!

Windows to the Universe Community

News

Opportunities

You might also be interested in:

Traveling Nitrogen Classroom Activity Kit

Check out our online store - minerals, fossils, books, activities, jewelry, and household items!...more

Fall 2005 Chicago NSTA Schedule

Windows to the Universe offered numerous workshops at the upcoming NSTA meeting in Chicago, Illinois. Workshops included: November 10 "Climate Change: Classroom Tools" - Explore the scientific foundations...more

Spring 2006 Anaheim NSTA Schedule

Windows to the Universe will offer numerous workshops at the upcoming NSTA meeting in Anaheim, California. Workshops include: April 6 "Bring Writing and Reading into Your Earth Science Classroom: Innovative...more

Classroom Tools to Explore the Past, Present and Future of Climate Change

Welcome to the online resources for our ever-popular NSTA workshop! This web portal is intended to provide the web links and additional information to those who attended our workshop at a recent NSTA...more

Workshop: Activities from Across the Earth System (also known as WALLS!)

Welcome to the online resources for our ever-popular Activities from Across the Earth System workshop for K-12 educators, formerly known as WALLS! This web portal is intended to provide the web links and...more

Workshop Resources: Can a Good Climate Go Bad? Past, Present, and Future Climate

Welcome to the online resources for the 2006 educators workshop, Can a Good Climate Go Bad? Past, Present, and Future Climate. This workshop, presented at the University of Texas by Teri Eastburn of UCAR...more

Classroom Tools to Explore the Past, Present and Future of Climate Change

Welcome to the online resources for our Climate Change workshop! This web portal is intended to provide the web links and additional information to those who attended our workshop at the Exhibit Museum....more

Playing with Ecosystem Science: Informal Modeling Games to Explore the Delicate Balance

Welcome to the online resources for our NSTA workshop, Playing with Ecosystem Science! This web portal is intended to provide the links and additional information to those who attended our workshop at...more

Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA