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This image is a radio map of Jupiter.
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JPL

Radio Signals of Saturn

Radio signals are a signature of activity within the magnetosphere. There are two kinds of waves in the Saturn environment; Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), and Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SED).

  • SKR
    It has been shown that SKR is associated with the effects of the solar wind on Saturn. It has been conjectured that SKR could be generated when plasma enters the magnetosphere. SKR, like AKR in the Earth's environment is also a signature of particles precipitating into the auroral zone.

    For (kilometric - SKR, AKR) radio emissions there must be a deficit of particles in the ionosphere. The needed depletion occurs at Saturn but neither at Uranus nor Neptune. Thus Saturn is a powerful radio emitter, whereas Uranus is not.

  • SED
    SED are impulsive radio emissions which come from lightning in the atmosphere. These are different from whistler waves, which also come from lightning in the atmosphere


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