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The Winter 2010 issue of The Earth Scientist includes a variety of educational resources, ranging from astronomy to glaciers. Check out the other publications and classroom materials in our online store.

Venus Statistics

Planetary Symbol: Name in Roman/Greek Mythology: Venus/Aphrodite
Diameter: 12,104 km (7,522 miles) Rotation Period about Axis: 243 days (retrograde)
Mass: 4.87x10^24 kilograms (0.82 x Earth's) Revolution Period about the Sun: 0.62 years
Density: 5,243 kg/m^3 Tilt of Axis: 177-178o
Minimum Distance from Sun: 108 million km
(67 million miles)
Surface Gravity: 8.87 m/s^2 (0.90 x Earth's)
Maximum Distance from Sun: 109 million km
(68 million miles)
Average Temperature (C/F): 457o C (855o F)
Orbital Semimajor Axis: 0.72 AU (Earth=1 AU) Average Surface Temperature (K): 730K
Minimum Distance from Earth: 40 million km
(25 million miles)
Satellites: 0

Venus Image Archive

Comparative Planetary Statistics -- in table form

Comparative Orbital Statistics -- in table form

Actual Distance to Earth

Last modified February 16, 2001 by Jennifer Bergman.

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