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Projects for Science Fairs & Beyond - Windows to the Universe

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Become a nitrogen atom in the nitrogen cycle in our Traveling Nitrogen Classroom Activity Kit/Game. See all our games, activity kits and classroom activities.
The front of a Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) monitor, which can detect sudden changes in Earth's ionosphere caused by solar flares and similar solar activity.
Click on image for full size
Image courtesy Stanford SOLAR Center.

Projects - for Science Fairs & Beyond

Interested in doing a project related to space weather for a science fair? The Stanford SOLAR Center provides information about space weather monitors that you can build yourself, including the Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance Monitor (SID). SID monitors detect sudden changes in the ionosphere (a region of Earth's atmosphere) that are often generated by solar flares and similar solar activity.

Last modified September 17, 2007 by Randy Russell.

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Learn about Earth and space science, and have fun while doing it! The games section of our online store includes a climate change card game and the Traveling Nitrogen game!

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF