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The Spring 2011 issue of The Earth Scientist is focused on modernizing seismology education. Thanks to IRIS, you can download this issue for free as a pdf. Print copies are available in our online store.

Aegir

Aegir was a fierce god of the sea. He had fingers like claws. His wife was named Ran, and they had nine daughters, the maidens believed to move the waves. Aegir would sometimes appear on the sea to destroy ships.

Often, he and his wife would use nets to capture sailors, and take them down into his underwater kingdom. Captain's would give coins to every sailor, so if they were captured they would have a gift for the gods.

Saxon pirates would often sacrifice every tenth prisoner, ensuring a safe journey across Aegir's sea. Aegir was shown as a powerful god, often holding a spear. He is very similar to the Greek god Poseidon.

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Our online store includes issues of NESTA's quarterly journal, The Earth Scientist, full of classroom activities on different topics in Earth and space science, ranging from seismology, rocks and minerals, oceanography, and Earth system science to astronomy!

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF