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Apollo, a Greek and Roman God - Windows to the Universe

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"Parnasus Apollo" by Raphael (1511).
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Image courtesy of Planet Art.

Apollo

In Greek mythology, Apollo was the son of Zeus (Jupiter) and Leto (Letona). His twin sister is Artemis (Diana). He was the god of the Sun, and was also a fine musician and healer.

He was known as the god who could foretell the future. His most famous sacred place was at Delphi, site of the Oracle of Delphi. Apollo and his sister had short tempers, and sometimes killed for revenge.

The Romans also believed in Apollo as the god of light, music, and healing.


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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF