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Star Wars Exhibition Brings Reality to Fantasy - Windows to the Universe

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In the Star Wars: Where Science Meets Imagination exhibit, Luke Skywalker's Landspeeder is on display for the first time.
Click on image for full size
Courtesy of Landspeeder image © 2006 Lucasfilm Ltd. & TM Photo: Dom Miguel Photography

Star Wars Exhibition Brings Reality to Fantasy
News story originally written on April 16, 2008

A new museum exhibit shows that some of the robots, vehicles and devices from the Star Wars films are close to the types of things scientists have developed to use in space.

The exhibition--at the Science Museum of Minnesota in St. Paul, Minn., from June 13 until August 24--displays landspeeders, R2D2 and other items from the Star Wars films. Visitors will learn how researchers today are using similar technologies. The exhibit developers were surprised and excited to learn that many of today's scientists were inspired by the fantasy technologies they saw in the Star Wars movies. One of the goals of the exhibit is to be an inspiration for the kids will be the next set of future scientists.

The exhibit contains film clips, props, models and costumes. Visitors are encouraged to participate in hands-on exhibits and activities.

Last modified June 9, 2008 by Becca Hatheway.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF