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Exploration of the Poles of the Earth - Windows to the Universe

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The Winter 2010 issue of The Earth Scientist includes a variety of educational resources, ranging from astronomy to glaciers. Check out the other publications and classroom materials in our online store.
McMurdo, Crary Lab center left, slope of Ob Hill in background. Photo taken in November 2003.
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Image has been released into public domain (found on wikipedia.org).

Exploration of the Poles of the Earth

Polar exploration includes the physical exploration of the Arctic and the Antarctica. The Arctic is the area around the Earth's north pole and includes parts of Canada, Greenland, Russia, the United States (Alaska), Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Arctic Ocean. In general, areas on Earth above the latitude of 66o33' N are considered part of the Arctic region (this line of latitude is often referred to as the Arctic circle). Antarctica is a bit more easily characterized as the southernmost continent or everything south of the Antarctic circle (66o33' S in latitude).

Humankind has always been driven to explore the unknown. Because of their extreme weather and dangerous oceans to cross, historically, the polar regions of the Earth proved to be hard places to reach. Though exploration of these regions has been going on since B.C. times, it wasn't until the last 100 years that many remote places were reached. Obviously, much exploration and study is yet to be done as permanent living stations and expeditions continue into the 21st century. Please choose any of the following links to explore more yourself!

Last modified June 18, 2007 by Lisa Gardiner.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF