Couldn't find element LayerAd

Error finding content

Northeaster in Action - Windows to the Universe

Shop Windows to the Universe

We now offer the Cool It! card game in our Science Store. Cool It! is the new card game from UCS that teaches kids about the choices we have when it comes to climate change.
This animation shows a northeaster moving up the East Coast.
Animation Courtesy of NOAA/National Climatic Data Center

Northeaster in Action

This radar image shows a northeaster that moved through the east coast of the United States on April 15-17, 2007. Several areas in the Mid-Atlantic and northeast regions were flooded because of heavy rain that fell along with strong winds. 7.6 inches (1.92 meters) of rain fell in New York City on April 15th from this northeaster. Accumulations of as much as 17 inches (43 cm) of snow fell in high elevation areas of northern New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire. This animation helps demonstrate how a northeaster builds in intensity. As the storm moves from the Atlantic Ocean onto land then to the areas of higher elevation, you can see the strong spin of the storm and the change in color from blue to yellow. A northeaster starts to weaken when it moves onto the higher terrain. The blue color represents clouds that are closer to the ground while the yellow color is colder clouds higher in the atmosphere. This northeaster affected the runners of the Boston Marathon. Strong winds also caused power outages from South Carolina to Maine.

Last modified August 1, 2008 by Vanessa Pearce.

Shop Windows to the Universe Science Store!

The Fall 2009 issue of The Earth Scientist, which includes articles on student research into building design for earthquakes and a classroom lab on the composition of the Earth’s ancient atmosphere, is available in our online store.

Windows to the Universe Community

News

Opportunities

You might also be interested in:

Traveling Nitrogen Classroom Activity Kit

Check out our online store - minerals, fossils, books, activities, jewelry, and household items!...more

How Radar Works

Radar is short for "radio detection and ranging". A transmitter sends pulses of high frequency radio waves. A radar echo shows up on a monitor and shows where the object is located.. A computer measures...more

Type of Wind: Northeaster

Northeasters, also known as nor’easters, are cyclonic, cold winds that develop in the mid-latitudes. They can bring heavy snow or sleet and gale force winds of 40-55 mph (64.5-88.7 kph). This type of wind...more

Rain

Rain is precipitation that falls to the Earth in drops of 5mm or more in diameter according to the US National Weather Service. Virga is rain that evaporates before reaching the ground. Raindrops form...more

Wind

Wind is moving air. Warm air rises, and cool air comes in to take its place. This movement creates different pressures in the atmosphere which creates the winds around the globe. Since the Earth spins,...more

Rainbows

Rainbows appear in the sky when there is bright sunlight and rain. Sunlight is known as visible or white light and is actually a mixture of colors. Rainbows result from the refraction and reflection of...more

The Four Seasons

The Earth travels around the sun one full time per year. During this year, the seasons change depending on the amount of sunlight reaching the surface and the Earth's tilt as it revolves around the sun....more

Research Aircraft

Scientists sometimes travel in specially outfitted airplanes in order to gather data about atmospheric conditions. These research aircraft have special inlet ports that bring air from the outside into...more

Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF