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We now offer the Cool It! card game in our Science Store. Cool It! is the new card game from UCS that teaches kids about the choices we have when it comes to climate change.

The Moon



Image of the moon taken by Star Tracker Camera B on Clementine orbit #110 on March 14, 1994.
Once on a time Ke´so, the Sun, and his sister, Tipä´ke‘so, the Moon (“last-night sun”) lived together in a wigwam in the east. The Sun dressed himself to go hunting, took his bow and arrows and left. He was absent such a long time that when his sister c ame out into the sky to look for her brother she became alarmed. She traveled twenty days looking for the Sun; but finally he returned, bringing with him a bear which he had shot.

The sun’s sister still comes up into the sky and travels for twenty days; then she dies, and for four days nothing is seen of her. At the end of that time, however, she returns to life and travels twenty days more.

The Sun is a being like ourselves. Whenever an Indian dreams of him he plucks out his hair and wears an otter skin about his head, over the forehead. This the Indian does because the Sun wears an otter skin about his head.


This page was created by Colleen Waukechon
March 25, 1996 for the Menominee Folk Tale Page.

The text is from Walter J. Hoffman's book, The Menomini Indians, circa 1888.

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