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Pick a Postcard - Life


Robberfly.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This photograph shows the short-eared owl (Asio flammeus). Owls are nocturnal birds that generally feed upon small rodents. The short-eared owl lives in open spaces around the world.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Polar Bear
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Lactarius deliciosus
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Insects like this bee are eaten as food in many countries. They may one day be used as food for astronauts.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

School of Anthias over green algae
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Bacteria.
Courtesy of NASA/JPL

Autumn Leaves
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Dog breeds from left to right: top row- Alaskan Malamute, Basset Hound, Llasa Apsa; middle row- Beagle puppy, Shar Pei, Chow; bottom row- Pekinese, Tibetan Terrier, Pug.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Parrotfish in a reef near Roatan, Honduras
Courtesy of Anne Pharamond

This dromedary is waiting for its owner to return.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Corals of Australia's Great Barrier Reef
Credit: UNC

If you see a gila monster like this one, you might want to stay away!
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This is a colobus monkey.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This large cat is a Leopard, Panthera pardus. Leopards are members of the cat family. They live throughout Africa and Asia.
Perfect Vision Graphics

This giant hairy scorpion was photographed in the Mojave Desert in California.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This snow bunting is looking for food in the snow.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This is a roadrunner. During the day, roadrunners hide in the bushes to keep cool.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This pretty toucan uses its large beak to grab fruit.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This is a spiny anteater. There are only three mammals that lay eggs, and the spiny anteater is one of them.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This wolverine looks like a cute little bear. But don't be fooled! They can be dangerous!
Courtesy of Corel Photography

This saguaro cactus holds plenty of water and has a waxy layer for protection from the Sun.
Courtesy of Corel Photography

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA