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Arches National Park Geology Tour provides an extensive, visually rich description of the geology of Arches, by Deborah Ragland, Ph.D. See our DVD collection.

Aegir

Aegir was a fierce god of the sea. He had fingers like claws. His wife was named Ran, by whom he had nine daughters, said to be the maidens who move the waves. Aegir would appear on the surface of the sea to destroy ships, or with his wife would catch sailors with a net to bring them into his underwater kingdom.

Captains would give coins to each sailor, so if they were captured they had a gift for the gods. It was believed that if the sailor's spirit was present at the funeral, Ran had given them a good welcome. There they were said to feast with Aegir and Ran. Sacrifices were offered by Saxon pirates, who used to drown every tenth man among their prisoners so that they could assure themselves a secure return home.

Aegir is often shown as a strong god with a spear in his hand. An old name for the sea, garsecg, literally means "spear-man". Aegir was very similar to the Greek god Poseidon. Poseidon was known for holding his trident.

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Our online store includes fun classroom activities for you and your students. Issues of NESTA's quarterly journal, The Earth Scientist are also full of classroom activities on different topics in Earth and space science!

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF