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We now offer the Cool It! card game in our Science Store. Cool It! is the new card game from UCS that teaches kids about the choices we have when it comes to climate change.

Cassini

A spacecraft named Cassini will study the planet Saturn for several years. Cassini blasted off from Earth in October 1997. After flying past Venus, Earth, and Jupiter, Cassini finally arrived at Saturn on July 1, 2004. Cassini will study Saturn from orbit for four years.

Cassini is also studying many of Saturn's moons and the planet's incredible rings. Just before it got to Saturn, Cassini flew near the moon Phoebe. It gave us our first close look at that strange moon on June 11, 2004.

NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) are the main groups behind the Cassini mission. Many different countries helped put the spacecraft together. The mission was named after Giovanni Cassini, who discovered the Cassini Division in Saturn's rings and several of Saturn's moons.

Cassini carries over 12 instruments that it is using to study Saturn and its rings and moons. The main spacecraft also carries a small lander called Huygens. The Huygens Probe will parachute down through Titan's atmosphere and land on the strange moon.


Last modified January 12, 2005 by Randy Russell.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA