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This image shows Rocks explored by the Rover.
Click on image for full size
Image from: JPL/NASA

Possible Origins of Rocks explored by the Rover

Unlike Earth where rivers can carry material for hundreds of miles, Martian rivers, which seem to be not very long at all, cannot transport material very long distances.

Because many of the rocks seem to be similar, some scientists guess that the boulders may have been eroded from a big rock 30 kilometers away.

On the other hand, some of the erosion features seen on the rocks may be signs that some of the rock may have been thrown out from the landing of a Big Crater, located 2.2 kilometers to the south of the landing site.


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