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Kingdom Protista



School of Anthias over green algae
Click on image for full size (58K)
Image courtesy of Corel Photography
Members of the Kingdom Protista are an unusual group of organisms that were put together because they don't really seem to belong to any other group. Some protists look or act like plants, others look and act like animals, but they're not!

In some ways, the Kingdom Protista is home for the "leftover" organisms that couldn't be classified elsewhere. You might not think a tiny one-celled amoeba has much in common with a giant sea kelp, but they're both members of this kingdom.

Kingdom Protista



School of Anthias over green algae
Click on image for full size (58K)
Image courtesy of Corel Photography
Members of the Kingdom Protista are the simplest of the eukaryotes. Protists are an unusual group of organisms that were put together because they don't really seem to belong to any other group. Some protists perform photosynthesis like plants while others move around and act like animals, but protists are neither plants nor animals. They're not fungi either - even though some might like to "think" they are!

In some ways, the Kingdom Protista is home for the "leftover" organisms that couldn't be classified elsewhere. You might not think a tiny one-celled amoeba has much in common with a giant sea kelp, but they're both members of this kingdom.

Kingdom Protista



School of Anthias over green algae
Click on image for full size (58K)
Image courtesy of Corel Photography
Members of the Kingdom Protista are the simplest of the eukaryotes. Protistans are an interesting assemblage of organisms classified for what they are not. Protistans lack characteristics shared by plants, fungi, and animals, but they're not bacteria. Essentially, this Kingdom is home for the "leftover" organisms that couldn't be classified elsewhere!

Protists can be unicellular, multicellular or colonial. Some move around and act like animals, others perform photosynthesis like plants, and still others seem to "think" they're fungi! You might not think a tiny one-celled amoeba has much in common with a giant sea kelp, but they're both members of the protist kingdoms.



Last modified prior to September, 2000 by the Windows Team

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