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This is an image of the surface of Io, looking down on a volcano and the lava plain surrounding it.
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NASA

Surface of Io

Unlike the other moons of Jupiter, Io is not made of ice. In fact, the surface of Io is rocky with many volcanoes. The volcanoes pour out lava of sulfur from the inside of Io.

The surface of Io can be cold enough for frost, however. White patches in the image indicate areas of frost on the surface.

The biggest volcanos of Io are called Loki and Prometheus. Between the volcanos are lava plains, much like those found in Hawaii near a volcano.

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Europa

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA