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This diagram shows the innermost moons of Jupiter, including Adrastea, as well as Jupiter's system of rings.
Click on image for full size
Image courtesy of NASA/JPL.

Adrastea

Adrastea is a small moon of Jupiter. Of Jupiter's 60 moons, it is the second closest to the planet. Adrastea was discovered by David Jewitt and Ed Danielson of the Voyager team in 1979.

Adrastea is tiny and not quite round. It measures 13 x 10 x 8 km (8 x 6 x 5 miles). It orbits Jupiter at a distance of 128,971 km (about 80 thousand miles) from the planet's center.

Adrastea and another nearby moon, Metis, orbit within Jupiter's main ring. The Galileo spacecraft discovered that dust knocked from the surface of these two moons by asteroid impacts generates the material that makes up the main ring!

In Roman mythology, Adrastea was the daughter of Jupiter and Ananke and the distributor of rewards and punishments.

Last modified October 10, 2003 by Randy Russell.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA