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Rosetta ready to go!
News story originally written on February 26, 2004

The Rosetta spacecraft is ready to go. It is waiting on the launch pad in South America on top of its Ariane rocket. It should blast off for its long trip to Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko sometime soon. It was supposed to blast off on February 26, 2004, but bad weather prevented the launch. There is another chance to launch the rocket tonight. Hopefully the weather will cooperate!

The Rosetta spacecraft has two parts. One part will orbit the comet. The other will land on the comet. If it works, Rosetta will be the first spacecraft ever to land on a comet.

If you want to learn more about comets, check out our interactive comet animation.

Last modified February 25, 2004 by Randy Russell.

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