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Sun-Earth Day 2005
News story originally written on March 18, 2005

March 20, 2005 is the Vernal Equinox (the "first day" of Spring in the Northern Hemisphere or the "first day" of Fall in the Southern Hemisphere). It is also Sun-Earth Day! Sun-Earth Day is a celebration of the Sun, the space around the Earth (geospace), and how all of it affects life on our planet. In classrooms, museums, planetariums, and at NASA centers, we plan to have a blast sharing stories, images, and activities related to the Sun-Earth connections in our Solar System.

NASA’s Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum provides lots of information about Sun-Earth Day. This year NASA's theme for Sun-Earth Day is "Ancient Observatories: Timeless Knowledge", which provides a look at observations of the Sun by many different cultures throughout history.

Please see the links below for more information on how to participate in Sun-Earth Day.

Last modified March 18, 2005 by Randy Russell.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA