An artist's depiction of a shooting star. Look out for meteors of all sizes during the shower this month!
Click on image for full size
Courtesy of Corel Photography

Make a wish on a shooting star! It's time for the Perseid meteor shower!
News story originally written on August 12, 2003

Look out for the Perseid meteor shower! People in the Northern Hemisphere will be able to see the largest number of meteors from the shower on Tuesday August 12th and Wednesday August 13th, 2003.

To see the most meteors, ask your parents if you can go out to look at the sky right after sunset on Tuesday August 12th, 2003 or wake up an hour before the sun rises on Wednesday August 13th, 2003. Make sure the sky is not covered with clouds.

Perseid meteoroids are little pieces of the comet Swift-Tuttle. This comet has a lot of dust that travels with it. The dust makes a cloud that the Earth speeds through every year at about this time. They may be tiny, but these dust particles can make an amazing show in the night sky!

Last modified August 12, 2003 by Lisa Gardiner.

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