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Ancient sediments like these in Brittany, France, help reconstruct Paleozoic sea-level history.
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Image Courtesy of Bil Haq, NSF

Paleozoic "Sediment Curve" Provides New Tool for Tracking Sea-floor Sediment Movements
News story originally written on October 2, 2008

Geologists have been studying a new way to learn where sedimentary rocks formed during the Paleozoic Era.

Balil Haq, a marine biologist, explains that scientists are using something called a sediment curve shows where sediment-on-the-move is deposited during the development of sedimentary rocks. This information helps scientists understand what happens when sea level rises and falls. Scientists can also use this information to interpret Earth history and learn where sediments are deposited to form rocks.

"We hope that the publication of a sediment curve for this entire era will enhance interest in Paleozoic geology," said Haq, "and help the exploration industry in its efforts to look at older and deeper sediments."

In addition to adding to scientific understanding, what scientists learn on this topic will help the oil industry to discover oil in places where searches have never taken place.

Last modified January 16, 2009 by Becca Hatheway.

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