Particle Transport by Wind

Once lifted off the surface, turbulent wind can easily sweep small dust particles high into the atmosphere. Picking up small particles is accomplished by means of saltation.

The air has an enormous capacity to hold dust. One cubic km of air may hold 1000 tons of dust. Storms of dust have been known to bury whole houses. The effect of this dust may depend upon wind speed.

Famous dust storms include


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA

Particle Transport by Wind

Once lifted off the surface, turbulent wind can easily sweep small dust particles high into the atmosphere. Picking up small particles is accomplished by means of saltation.

The air has an enormous capacity to hold dust. One cubic km of air may hold 1000 tons of dust. Storms of dust have been known to bury whole houses. The effect of this dust may depend upon wind speed.

Famous dust storms include


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA

Particle Transport by Wind

Once lifted off the surface, turbulent wind can easily sweep small dust particles high into the atmosphere. Picking up small particles is accomplished by means of saltation.

The air has an enormous capacity to hold dust. One cubic km of air may hold 1000 tons of dust. Storms of dust have been known to bury whole houses. The effect of this dust may depend upon wind speed.

Famous dust storms include


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA


Last modified November 15, 1997 by the Windows Team

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