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Weathering

Weathering is the name for a process whereby rocks are broken down. The processes which do this are water, wind, acids, and the motion of the earth's crust.

Wind drives particles into the rock and gradually blasts rock into smaller pieces. Pressure from adjoining sections of the earth cause rocks to crack apart as well as fold and buckle. Pressure from water also causes rock to crack into smaller pieces.

Gradually these processes reduce large landforms to rubble, where their constituent components can then be reformed into new landforms.


This picture illustrates erosion.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from:

Go to a listing of Rocks


Weathering

Erosion, or weathering is the name for a process whereby rocks are broken down into their most fundamental elements. The processes which do this are water, wind, acids, and the motion of the earth's crust.

Wind drives particles into the rock and gradually blasts rock into smaller pieces. Pressure from adjoining sections of the earth cause rocks to crack apart as well as fold and buckle. Pressure from water also causes rock to crack into smaller pieces.

Gradually these processes reduce large landforms to rubble, where their constituent components can then be reformed into new landforms.


This picture illustrates erosion.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from:

Go to a listing of Rocks


Weathering

Erosion is the name for a process whereby rocks are broken down into the things that they are made of. The processes which do this are water, wind, chemicals, and the motion of the earth's crust.

Wind drives particles into the rock and gradually blasts rock into smaller pieces. Pressure from adjoining sections of the earth cause rocks to crack apart as well as fold and buckle. Pressure from water also causes rock to crack into smaller pieces.

Gradually these processes reduce large landforms to rubble, where their constituent components can then be reformed into new landforms.


This picture illustrates erosion.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from:

Go to a listing of Rocks



Last modified January 26, 1999 by the Windows Team

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