NOTE: If you can read this, then you have not entered our site from the proper entry point! In order for all links to function properly, you must start by clicking here.



Saltation

Small grains which are lifted into the air (or into the water from a river bed) may fall back to the ground again. When they hit the ground they may induce a nearby grain to fly into the air (or water). This skipping and jumping motion of small grains is called "saltation".

Saltation is initiated by sand grains which are high enough off the ground to be in the local wind stream. These grains may break off or roll away, kicking up other particles when they land. Abrasion from saltation is controlled by wind

The movement of sand grains in air or water creates ripples and dunes along the surface.


This drawing illustrates a process called "saltation".

Saltation

Small grains which are lifted into the air (or into the water from a river bed) may fall back to the ground again. When they hit the ground they may cause a nearby grain to fly into the air (or water). This skipping and jumping motion of small grains is called "saltation".

Saltation is started by sand grains which are high enough off the ground to be in the local wind stream. These grains may break off or roll away, kicking up other particles when they land.

The movement of sand grains in air or water creates ripples and dunes along the surface.


This drawing illustrates a process called "saltation".

Saltation

Small grains which are lifted into the air (or into the water from a river bed) may fall back to the ground again. When they hit the ground they may cause a nearby grain to fly into the air (or water). This skipping and jumping motion of small grains is called "saltation".

Saltation is started by sand grains which are high enough off the ground to be in the local wind stream. These grains may break off or roll away, kicking up other particles when they land.

The movement of sand grains in air or water creates ripples and dunes along the surface.


This drawing illustrates a process called "saltation".



Last modified January 15, 1998 by the Windows Team

The source of this material is Windows to the Universe, at http://www.windows.ucar.edu/ at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). © The Regents of the University of Michigan. Windows to the Universe® is a registered trademark of UCAR. All Rights Reserved. Site policies and disclaimer