The Quartz Group SiO2

The density of this mineral is 2600 kg/m3

Quartz is one of the most important mineral components of granite, consists of silicon and oxygen joined to each other. These two elements, one a solid and one a gas in their elemental states, are tighly bound together in definite crystalline form (SiO2). Quartz is a hard mineral, virtually insoluble in water.

How does Quartz relate to the magma chamber?
If a cooling magma has silicon left after feldspars have formed, silica is likely to form. The most common form is the familiar mineral quartz. Opal, jasper, agate, chalcedony, and flint are highly attractive other forms of nearly pure quartz. Because of its low density, quartz is also like to float in the magma and accumulate in surface rocks. If there is very active geological processing and differentiation, quartz may become very concentrated at the surface, because its density is even less than that of many feldspars. These conditions are especially prevelant on Earth, where there has been extensive plate tectonics.

Quartz, Garnet,Epidote, Olivine, and Zircon all are independent tetrahedral silicates. That makes them extraordinarily resistant to erosion (as individual units) but very susceptible to metamorphism.


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The Quartz Group SiO2

The density of this mineral is 2600 kg/m3

Quartz is one of the most important mineral components of granite, consists of silicon and oxygen joined to each other. These two elements, one a solid and one a gas in their elemental states, are tighly bound together in definite crystalline form (SiO2). Quartz is a hard mineral, virtually impossible to dissolve in water.

How does Quartz relate to the magma chamber?
If a cooling magma has silicon left after feldspars have formed, silica is likely to form. The most common form is the familiar mineral quartz. Opal, jasper, agate, chalcedony, and flint are highly attractive other forms of nearly pure quartz. Because of its low density, quartz is also like to float in the magma and accumulate in surface rocks. If there is very active geological processing and differentiation, quartz may become very concentrated at the surface, because its density is even less than that of many feldspars. These conditions are especially prevelant on Earth, where there has been extensive plate tectonics.

Quartz, is extraordinarily resistant to erosion (as individual units) but very susceptible to metamorphism.


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Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
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The major types of minerals

Not applicable at this reading level.


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA

Go to a listing of Rocks by mineral group



Last modified November 15, 1997 by the Windows Team

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