The Olivine Group (Mg,Fe)2(SiO4)

The density of this mineral is 3300-4400 kg/m3

Much of the Earth is made out of this mineral, and it is a major component of the mantles of other terrestrial planets. It is usually a greenish crystal and is often found as inclusions in basaltic lavas.

How do olivines relate to the magma chamber?
Because of its high density, it sinks to the lowest parts of magma chambers. It is thus important in materials formed under pressure such as some meteorites, and planetary lavas.

The group includes minerals such as foresterite and fayalite. They have independent tetrahedral structure, which makes them resistant to weathering (as individual units) but susceptible to metamorphism.


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA

Go to a listing of Rocks by mineral group


The Olivine Group (Mg,Fe)2(SiO4)

The density of this mineral is 3300-4400 kg/m3

Much of the Earth is made out of this mineral, and it is a major component of the mantles of other terrestrial planets. It is usually a greenish crystal and is often found as inclusions in basaltic lavas.

How do olivines relate to the magma chamber?
Because of its high density, it sinks to the lowest parts of magma chambers. It is thus important in materials formed under pressure such as some meteorites, and planetary lavas.

The group includes minerals such as foresterite and fayalite. They have independent tetrahedral structure, which makes them resistant to weathering (as individual units) but susceptible to metamorphism.


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA

Go to a listing of Rocks by mineral group


The major types of minerals

Not applicable at this reading level.


This is a view of the Earth.
Click on image for full size version (40K GIF)
Image from: NOAA

Go to a listing of Rocks by mineral group



Last modified November 15, 1997 by the Windows Team

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