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Frost Weathering

Frost weathering takes place under the activity of recurrent expansions and contractions, which accompany the process of freezing and thawing of water in the fissures and porous voids of rocks.


Snow contributes to frost weathering.
Click on image for full size version (40K JPG)
Image from: C. Alexander

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Frost Weathering

Frost weathering takes place when frost, snow, and other forms of frozen water in the pits and holes of rocks keeps expanding and contracting during the process of freezing and thawing.

When water freezes, it occupies a larger volume. The process can be observed when water is placed in a container in the refrigerator freezer to become ice cubes. When the water has frozen, it expands out of the container it was placed in.

In nature, this process eventually cracks pieces of rock away from the parent rock.


Snow contributes to frost weathering.
Click on image for full size version (40K JPG)
Image from: C. Alexander

Go to a listing of Rocks


Not applicable at this reading level.



Last modified November 15, 1997 by the Windows Team

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