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Fluvial Processes

Collected water in the form of rivers, currents, and channels, has the ability to wear away and erode rock, as well as to carry away the fragmented sediments created by the very action of the waters. This debris is called "allivium", and the action of water wearing away at hillsides leads to the familiar scene of piles of soil at the foothills of mountains known to geologists as "alluvial deposits".

The process of transporting sediments causes rivers to shape the land on which they flow. Both the movement of particles and the accompanying erosion is accomplished by action within water currents themselves, as well as the force of the current as a whole.

The products of weathering and other debris are washed into the ground as part of the water cycle and eventually forms soil and sedimentary rock.

This wonderful picture of the Colorado River illustrates the carving power of a river channel as a whole, as well as illustrating the ability of a river (on Earth) to carry sediments very long distances. The picture also illustrates what is known as a river "network".


This is a picture of the Colorado River.
Click on image for full size version (128K GIF)
Image from: Aris Multimedia Entertainment, Inc. 1994

Return to the Water Cycle

Rivers Image Archive


The Action of Water

Rivers have the ability to wear away and erode rock, as well as to carry away the fragmented sediments created by the very action of the waters. The whole process causes rivers to shape the land on which they flow. Both the movement of particles by water as well as the erosion of the river bed is accomplished by action within water currents themselves, as well as the force of the current as a whole.

In the process, the residue of the erosion of rocks is washed into the ground as part of the water cycle and eventually forms soil and sedimentary rock.

This wonderful picture of the Colorado River illustrates the carving power of a river channel as a whole, as well as illustrating the ability of a river (on Earth) to carry sediments very long distances. The picture also illustrates what is known as a river "network".


This is a picture of the Colorado River.
Click on image for full size version (128K GIF)
Image from: Aris Multimedia Entertainment, Inc. 1994

Return to the Water Cycle

Rivers Image Archive


The Action of Water

Rivers have the ability to wear away and erode rock, as well as to carry away the pieces of rock, or sediments. The movement of particles by water and the erosion of the river bed is accomplished by action within water currents themselves, as well as the force of the current as a whole. This process causes the river to shape the land on which it flows.

This wonderful picture of the Colorado River illustrates a river and its tributaries.

The products of erosion of rock are washed into the ground as part of the water cycle and eventually forms soil and sedimentary rock.


This is a picture of the Colorado River.
Click on image for full size version (128K GIF)
Image from: Aris Multimedia Entertainment, Inc. 1994

Return to the Water Cycle

Rivers Image Archive




Last modified January 15, 1998 by the Windows Team

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