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Dune Formation

The movement of sand grains in air or water creates ripples and dunes along the surface. Ripples are low and narrow ridges which come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and patterns. The pattern of ripples move more slowly than saltating particles.

Higher velocity in the flowing air or water build higher ridges which result in the formation of dunes by the very same mechanism as the formation of ripples. These ridges are called dunes.


This picture shows evidence of ripples in the sand.
Click on image for full size version (43K JPG)

Dune Formation

The movement of sand grains in air or water creates ripples and dunes along the surface. Ripples are low and narrow ridges which come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and patterns. The pattern of ripples move more slowly than saltating particles.

Higher velocity in the flowing air or water build higher ridges which result in the formation of dunes by the very same mechanism as the formation of ripples. These ridges are called dunes.


This picture shows evidence of ripples in the sand.
Click on image for full size version (43K JPG)

Dune Formation

The movement of sand grains in air or water creates ripples and dunes along the surface. Ripples are low and narrow ridges which come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and patterns. The pattern of ripples move more slowly than saltating particles.

Higher velocity in the flowing air or water build higher ridges which result in the formation of dunes by the very same mechanism as the formation of ripples. These ridges are called dunes.


This picture shows evidence of ripples in the sand.
Click on image for full size version (43K JPG)


Last modified January 15, 1998 by the Windows Team

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