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The Spring 2011 issue of The Earth Scientist is focused on modernizing seismology education. Thanks to IRIS, you can download this issue for free as a pdf. Print copies are available in our online store.
This is an image of Mt. Cotopaxi in Ecuador.
Click on image for full size
Image from the U.S. Geological Survey

Composite Volcanoes

The most majestic of the volcanoes are composite volcanoes. These are also known as strato-volcanoes. Unlike the shield volcanoes which are flat and broad, composite volcanoes are tall, symmetrically shaped, with steep sides, sometimes rising 10,000 feet high. They are made of alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs.

Famous composite volcanoes include Mount Fuji in Japan, Mount Cotopaxi in Ecuador, Mount Shasta and Lassen in California, Mount Hood in Oregon, Mount St. Helens and Mount Rainier in Washington, Mt Pinatubo in the Philipenes, and Mt. Etna in Italy.


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Shield Volcanos

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