Shop Windows to the Universe

We now offer the Cool It! card game in our Science Store. Cool It! is the new card game from UCS that teaches kids about the choices we have when it comes to climate change.
Hematite
Click on image for full size
Windows to the Universe original image

Hematite

A sample of hematite may look like little more than a dark gray blob. That might seem impossible to identify but with a streak test, you can easily identify it! To tell if it is hematite, just rub the mineral against a white streak plate and it will form a small amount of red powder!

The largest amounts of hematite are found in sedimentary rocks that formed from weathering iron-rich minerals. In these sedimentary deposits, hematite is thought to have precipitated from lakes or seas by organic and/or chemical processes. The hematite often occurs with intermixed layers of quartz or chert.

Hematite is an important ore of iron. It is also used as a pigment in paint and in polishing compounds. It is made into a variety of handcrafted objects such as beads and jewelry.

  • Shape: Trigonal (commonly occurs as tabular crystals)
  • Luster: Metallic to sub-metalic to dull
  • Color: Reddish-brown, gray to black
  • Streak: Red
  • Hardness: 5.5 to 6.5 on Mohs Hardness Scale
  • Cleavage: None
  • Fracture: Conchoidal

Last modified April 25, 2003 by Lisa Gardiner.

Shop Windows to the Universe Science Store!

The Fall 2010 issue of The Earth Scientist, focuses on rocks and minerals, including articles on minerals and mining, the use of minerals in society, and rare earth minerals, and includes 3 posters!

Windows to the Universe Community

News

Opportunities

You might also be interested in:

Traveling Nitrogen Classroom Activity Kit

Check out our online store - minerals, fossils, books, activities, jewelry, and household items!...more

MER Opportunity Landing Site - Meridiani Planum

The second Mars Exploration Rover (MER), named "Opportunity", landed at a site on Mars known as Meridiani Planum. This flat plain is one of the few places on Mars where the mineral gray hematite is found...more

Meridiani Planum location on Mars

Meridiani Planum is a small, flat region near the equator on Mars. As is the case on Earth, locations on Mars are specified by stating their latitude and longitude. Meridiani Planum is near the prime meridian,...more

Whatís That Mineral?

Each type of mineral is made of a unique group of elements that are arranged in a unique pattern. However, to identify minerals you donít need to look at the elements with sophisticated chemical tests....more

Quartz

Quartz is the second most common mineral in Earthís crust. It is a member of the quartz group, which includes less common minerals such as opal, crystobalite, and coesite. Silica (Si) and Oxygen (O) are...more

Mica Minerals

Mica minerals make some rocks sparkle! They are often found in igneous rocks such as granite and metamorphic rocks such as schist. They sparkle because light is reflected on their flat surfaces, which...more

Feldspar

Feldspar is the most common mineral in the Earthís crust, so you are very likely to find it in the rocks you collect! It is found it all of the three rock types, but is most common in intrusive igneous...more

Olivine

Olivine looks like little green crystals. It is typically found in some igneous and metamorphic rocks. Often the crystals are so small that you need to use your hand lens or magnifying glass to see them...more

Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation and NASA, our Founding Partners (the American Geophysical Union and American Geosciences Institute) as well as through Institutional, Contributing, and Affiliate Partners, individual memberships and generous donors. Thank you for your support! NASA AGU AGI NSF