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Science, Evolution, and Creationism, by the National Academies, focuses on teaching evolution in today's classrooms. Check out the other publications in our online store.
This offshore wind farm in Denmark includes 72 turbines and generates enough clean energy to power 110,000 homes.
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What is "Carbon Neutral"?

Every time we travel or turn on our computers, we add greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Most of the energy we use comes from oil, coal, and gas. Solar and wind power does not cause climate change. But it often costs more.

Being "carbon neutral" means removing as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as we put in. How can we remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere? One way is to buy "carbon offsets". This supports projects like a wind farm or solar park. It helps make clean energy cheaper. It removes future greenhouse gases to make up for our energy use today.

Start with the Carbon Calculator link below. Find out how much carbon dioxide comes from the things we do every day. Then explore the list of projects that provide Carbon Offsets. We are on our way to being "carbon neutral"!

Last modified February 6, 2008 by Travis Metcalfe.

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The Summer 2010 issue of The Earth Scientist, available in our online store, includes articles on rivers and snow, classroom planetariums, satellites and oceanography, hands-on astronomy, and global warming.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA