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We now offer the Cool It! card game in our Science Store. Cool It! is the new card game from UCS that teaches kids about the choices we have when it comes to climate change.
Some supercomputers can do more than 80 million calculations an hour! How fast could you do your math homework if you had a supercomputer?
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Modeling the Future of Climate Change

To figure out the future of climate change, scientists need tools to measure how Earth responds to change. Some of these tools are global climate models. Using models, scientists can better understand how the Earth works and how it will react to change in the future.

Global climate models (GCMs) use math to describe how the Earth works. Supercomputers are needed to run large global climate models. These speedy computers can sometimes do more than 80 million math problems in an hour.

Climate models usually try to take into account all the parts of the Earth system including:

For more information about climate models, visit the following pages:

What will the next century bring? According to scientists, it is likely that temperatures will rise 1.8 to 4.0C (3.1 to 7.2F) in the next 100 years if we continue to let more greenhouse gases loose in the atmosphere. A smaller amount of warming (0.6C or 1.0 F) over the past century has caused disruptions to the planet. So, more warming over the next century would likely cause many more changes to Earth.

Last modified September 23, 2008 by Lisa Gardiner.

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The Winter 2009 issue of The Earth Scientist, focuses on Earth System science, including articles on student inquiry, differentiated instruction, geomorphic concepts, the rock cycle, and much more!

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA