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The Spring 2011 issue of The Earth Scientist is focused on modernizing seismology education. Thanks to IRIS, you can download this issue for free as a pdf. Print copies are available in our online store.
This is a simple density-depth ocean water profile. You can see density increases with increasing depth. The pycnocline are layers of water where the water density changes rapidly with depth. This density-depth profile is typical of what you might expect to find at a latitude of 30-40 degrees south.
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Density of Ocean Water

The density of pure water is 1000 kg/m3. Ocean water is more dense because it has salt in it. Density of ocean water is about 1027 kg/m3 at the top of the ocean.

Less dense water floats on top of more dense water. So, if you were to head to the bottom of the ocean in a submarine, the water would get more and more dense as you went!

Last modified August 31, 2001 by Jennifer Bergman.

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