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This photo shows water drops that have condensed on blades of grass.
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Image Courtesy of Taro Taylor, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License

Condensation

Condensation is when water changes its state from a vapor or gas to a liquid. Condensation is responsible for the formation of clouds. Common examples of condensation are: dew forming on grass in the early morning, eye glasses fogging up when you enter a warm building on a cold winter day, or water drops forming on a glass holding a cold drink on a hot summer day.

Condensation occurs when water droplets form due to cooling air. When warm air cools, water leaves the vapor in the warm water and condenses into liquid.

Last modified July 22, 2008 by Becca Hatheway.

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