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Science, Evolution, and Creationism, by the National Academies, focuses on teaching evolution in today's classrooms. Check out the other publications in our online store.
This image shows a picture of a whale's tail sticking out of the water. Whales can often be identified by their tail features.
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Windows Original, adapted from Corel Photography

Whales

Whales, like dolphins, are part of the Cetacea order. The name Cetacea comes from the Latin 'cetus', which means large marine creature or sea monster! But, whales are no danger to people...

Actually, it is people who are a threat to whales. Over the last 150 years, many species of whales have been brought close to extinction because of unconstrained whale hunting.

Whales strain plankton from the sea or they eat fish. Killer whales do eat squid and sometimes seals and otters too.

Whales make lots of unique and complex noises. We call them whale songs. One song may last as long as 35 minutes. The songs are used in identifying other whales, warning other whales of the same pod and in increasing sexual attraction between possible mating pairs.


Last modified May 15, 2009 by Jennifer Bergman.

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Traveling Nitrogen is a fun group game appropriate for the classroom. Players follow nitrogen atoms through living and nonliving parts of the nitrogen cycle. For grades 5-9.

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Windows to the Universe, a project of the National Earth Science Teachers Association, is sponsored in part is sponsored in part through grants from federal agencies (NASA and NOAA), and partnerships with affiliated organizations, including the American Geophysical Union, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Earth System Information Partnership, the American Meteorological Society, the National Center for Science Education, and TERC. The American Geophysical Union and the American Geosciences Institute are Windows to the Universe Founding Partners. NESTA welcomes new Institutional Affiliates in support of our ongoing programs, as well as collaborations on new projects. Contact NESTA for more information. NASA ESIP NCSE HHMI AGU AGI AMS NOAA